League for Hope
         
Crowdsourcing emergency response Pt. 3 - Crowdsourcing in Action

January 2011: This is the last post in a three-part series focusing on crowdsourcing in relation to emergency response during a crisis. The idea of accruing large amounts of data from the public during an emergency, or sending data out to be crunched by the masses, is at the heart of this actionable information and situational awareness relationship: from crisis mapping to handling the incredible amount of data during an emergency.

Crowdsourcing emergency response Pt. 2 - Crisis Mapping and Crowdsource Response Organzations

January 2011; In the previous post, crowdsourcing was shown as a way of collecting, analyzing and disseminating information. The challenge of crunching huge amounts data in real time from various media has always presented a problem for emergency response personnel, but with crowdsourcing, information processing has become much easier, actionable and faster. Taking that information and overlaying it onto real-time mapping is the purview of crisis mapping, an emerging emergency response discipline. And there are organizations who use crisis mapping as their primary focus for humanitarian aid.

Crowdsourcing emergency response Pt. 1

January 2011: One of the largest hurdles facing emergency responders is how to handle the amount of real-time information during a crisis. In order to get a clear picture of what is happening right after an earthquake, during a hurricane, in the aftermath of a terrorist attack, or before a flood hits, emergency response personnel and officials are increasingly turning to crowdsourcing as a way to digest large amounts of data and turn that data into actionable intelligence. Through social networking, text messaging and video crowdsourcing allows for multimedia information to be amalgamated and synthesized.

     
 
Phase I: Communications Uplinks

Many populations in remote areas are without dependable communications to support humanitarian on-site programs, or distance contact with remote supporters. LFH partners will develop an easily installed and operated robust communications core utilizing a satellite uplink to facilitate telemedicine, educational, commerical and artistic programs.

Phase II: Community Infrastructure

LFH partners will contribute their expertise, wealth and capabilities to develop micro-community centers that include vocational schools, arts/cultural centers, medical clinics built around LFH communications centers. Working with private sector partners and NGOs, LFH will help finance infrastrucure and support on-going partnerships to create markets for art and music, goods, training and other vital connections.

Phase III: Build-Out

Each project undertaken by LFH will anticipate a build-out stage, where private sector partners can build and sell homes, shops and other commercially attractive enterprises that use sustainable building materials and create jobs for the local population. LFH arranges investment insurance, both government and private, to make the investment attractive to potential partners. LFH will also help create locally governed credit cooperative to administer the titling, lending and administration of land/home sales including Sharia-compliant models.

 
Group working to push technology innovation for world's poor
| 05.29.2007 | 09:24:065117 |

May 29 '07: The New York Times reported recently that the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum has a new exhibit working to target the world's poorest population by displaying technologies that could help them improve their way of life. Organizers of the program told the Times that their goal was to help turn farmers into entrepreneurs.

The exhibit, called "Design for the Other 90%" encompasses "a broad set of modern social and economic concerns .... [that] help rather than exploit, poorer economies; minimize environmental impact; increase social inclusion; improve healthcare at all levels; and advance the quality and accessibility of education," the website read.

"To that end," the Times reported, "the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, is honoring inventors dedicated to ... the billions of people living on less than $2 a day." The technologies on display will be at the museum until September 23. Examples include an enclosed water bucket in the shape of a O that can be rolled along the ground; using pot-in-pot system to help cool produce; and irrigation pumps which can be used by hand to help grow crops during drought periods.

"Of the world's total population of 6.5 billion, 5.8 billion people, or 90%, have little or no access to most of the products and services many of us take for granted," the website read. "Design for the Other 90% explores a growing movement among designers to design low-cost solutions for this 'other 90%'."

 
     

 

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